HOW TO CHOOSE A SUMMER CAMBLE AND PREPARE IT?

HOW TO CHOOSE A SUMMER CAMBLE AND PREPARE IT?
At the end of the school year and in the summer's coming, the parents think about what their child will do this summer. Everyone wants the children to be able to get away from the computer or TV screens during the holidays, communicate, develop their talents, improve themselves. Today the choice of camps is really great. In addition to traditional camps, it is advisable to travel to the thematic - you can choose fortified, musical, sports, creative, languages, survival, dance, etc. camps

WHAT CHILD HAS CHOOSE TO CAVE?
HOW TO SELECT THE SUMMER CAMBLE FOR SUITABLE SELECTION?
HOW TO ORDER THE CUMBLES?
The benefits of summer camps for children are unmistakable - employment, fun in the fresh air, new acquaintances, cultivated creativity, language and communication skills, feelings of autonomy, responsibility, self-confidence. This is a great option for working parents who can not afford to waste their time off.
In summer camps children are accepted from 5 years old, in day camps - even from 3 years old, in camps abroad - from 7 years. However, no matter how old your child is, both children and parents are worried about the camp for the first time. Often, doubts arise about the age at which a child is allowed to enter the camp, what camp to choose, how to prepare for a camp, etc.

WHAT CHILD HAS CHOOSE TO CAVE?
Before evaluating your child for the first time in a summer camp, evaluate his character. The following questions will help you:
• How does the child adapt to the new environment? How fast do you get to a stranger?
• Does the child easily keep up with other people?
• Is the child communicative, communicating with others, or quickly finding common interests?
• How does he feel in peer groups and among older children?
• How does a child respond when one is left without parental care?
• Is the child alive at home, how did he succeed?
• How does a child make a difference in sharing toys?
• How did the child succeed in getting a nursery in different groups?
• Is the child sufficiently independent? Will he be able to take care of his belongings, put up a bed, take care of hygiene, dress up, etc.?

Only you best know your child and his needs. If you are sure that he is independent and able to adapt to the new environment, then you are ready to travel to the camp.

One of the most common mistakes made by parents is to choose a camp without taking into account the child's interests and interests. Remember that your offspring are worried about going to the camp just like you. Talk to the child, discuss, discuss camps and discuss the camp best suited to the needs of the child.

HOW TO SELECT THE SUMMER CAMBLE FOR SUITABLE SELECTION?
Evaluate the following:
• How old is the child?
• What type of camp (days, stationary) is the most suitable? If the child does not feel courageous when leaving home, a day or family camp would be better suited for him.
• Does your child tend to sport / menus / etc?
• What activities predominate in the selected camp program?
• What kind of accommodation, environment and meals are acceptable to you?
• Will the camp have professional managers? As a rule, camps are trying to provide as much information as possible about camp leaders.
• Where is the camp located? Is there a lake or other water body near it?
• How far is your camp home? Do you have a way to get there? Is it possible to arrange a childrens drive?

We recommend reading the feedback from other children and parents, if available, to view the photos of the camp. This can help you choose a camp. Many reviews and photos from various camps can be found on the Facebook Summer Summer Camp site.

HOW TO ORDER THE CUMBLES?
Once you have chosen the camp, you will need to prepare for it. Not just to load things, but also to prepare for a longer separation. Here are some tips to help mitigate this situation:
• Show the child the photos of the camp, and if possible, visit the camp.
• Read discussions and reviews about the camp - this will allow you to see an image of the camp in action. This leaves much less ambiguity and, at the same time, fears.
• Talk to the child about what he expects from the camp, maybe he's afraid of something, maybe something is worrying. Knowing the child's fears, you will be able to tell them about their arrival to the camp.
• Did you go to the camp at your childhood or adolescence? Tell the child what you were doing at the camp, what memories are there, why you were having fun there. It is important to convey your positive emotions and infect your child with optimism.
• If your child's friends, classmates, or relatives went to the camp, ask them to share their impressions.
• Patiently respond to all questions from the child, even if the question is asked for the third time or if you do not have an exact answer to it, for example, "will the light go out at night?"
• Give the child psychologically correct. If you know that there will be many tasks in the camp where you can overcome, explain to the child that it is not necessary to always win everywhere that the most important thing is to have fun